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The price war continues for major pizza chains, but both Pizza Hut and Papa John’s Pizza have added a different angle to their start-of-year marketing campaigns. Both are tying a limited-time, low-price offer to a brand anniversary, allowing them to easily end the promotion without setting an expectation for a repeat performance every year.

“Cheaper isn’t always better,” Tristano said, “and for restaurant operators, it’s not a viable long-term and sustainable strategy.”

Plano, Texas-based Pizza Hut, a division of Louisville, Ky.-based Yum! Brands Inc., is offering 50 percent off medium and large pizzas ordered online at menu price for its Hut Lovers loyalty club members. New members of Hut Lovers may sign up and immediately redeem the offer, which will run through Jan. 10.

Watch Pizza Hut's ad for 20 years of online ordering

The impetus for the promotion is the anniversary of the first Pizza Hut order taken over the Internet, in Santa Cruz, Calif., in 1994. The chain of 14,000 restaurants worldwide has resurrected its original online-ordering hub from that year, PizzaNet, which the brand said produced the first thing ever purchased from the Internet.

“We want to celebrate the fact that before consumers could buy books, clothes, music or vacation packages via the Internet, they could place an online order for a Pizza Hut pizza,” Carrie Walsh, chief marketing officer for Pizza Hut’s U.S. division, said in a statement.

Pizza Hut’s commercial promotes the deal by harkening back to 1994 with one of the most popular songs of that year, “The Sign” by Ace of Base.

Louisville-based Papa John’s is taking customers back a decade further with its deal to celebrate its 30th anniversary. Through Jan. 26, consumers can add a large one-topping pizza for 30 cents, with the purchase of a large pizza at regular menu price. Papa John’s has 4,300 restaurants worldwide.

Fast-casual chains and value

Technomic’s Tristano noted that fast-casual concepts by and large do not run aggressive promotions in January or throughout the rest of the year, but those chains nonetheless could bolster their value perceptions through product news like other limited-service brands have done.

“You could conclude that brands like Jimmy John’s or Firehouse Subs don’t compete with Subway — their quality is a step above and their prices are $3 above — but the reality is consumers use both,” he said. “Consumers go higher in price one day, then look for low prices the next day to balance it out.”

Reconsidering ways to provide more value could be the way fast-casual brands make better inroads at the dinner daypart or with certain demographic groups, like women or Hispanics, Tristano added.

Women tend to look for smaller portions, which fast-casual brands could offer, even at a slightly higher price point, he said, while Hispanic customers tend to focus on family occasions when dining out. Both look for bolder, spicier flavors, he said.

“You have opportunities for more social occasions by offering a family-oriented package … or options for sampling and sharing,” Tristano said. “You don’t see as many parties of three or more in fast casual, and that might be the way for [those restaurants] to continue their momentum.”

Contact Mark Brandau at mark.brandau@penton.com
Follow him on Twitter: @Mark_from_NRN